Friday, June 24, 2016

Graffiti photography

Graffiti adds a touch of the unconventional to city landscapes and is undoubtedly a fantastic subject for photography.  It’s not normally hard to find graffiti – the best areas are normally a little off the beaten track, rundown areas of the city, docklands, warehouses and similar.  Love it or hate it graffiti is all over so get your camera out and photograph it.


When searching for graffiti, always bear in mind your personal safety. If you’re thinking about exploring one of the rougher areas of town or an empty warehouse, consider going with a friend and try to keep a low profile and not flash expensive camera equipment about. Consider using a normal bag rather than an obvious camera bag to carry your kit.

Graffiti also looks great not only on the wall

             

Monday, May 30, 2016

Mistakes Fine Art Photographers Make VII : Hand-Holding the Camera

A tripod is the single best investment most fine art photographers could make. A tripod is cheap, versatile, low-tech, and easy to use. A tripod makes photography in challenging light easy, and provides a whole repertoire of options for photographing motion. Better yet, a tripod provides precise control over the composition of a photograph, allowing the photographer to carefully inspect and correct their composition before exposing. Properly used, a tripod could improve 80% of most fine art photographers' photos.
So why do so many photographers hand-hold their cameras?
Probably because hand-holding the camera is an easier, more spontaneous way to make a photograph. Hand-holding your camera let you explore compositions without being restricted by a heavy tripod. Freely moving the camera is especially important when photographing, a dense, detailed subject, where the best composition is not obvious and must be found through the lens.
My "best of both worlds" solution is to use a tripod with a quick-release attachment on the head. This lets me roughly find a composition through the lens by hand-holding, and quickly snap my camera onto my tripod when I'm ready to make the photograph. It also helps to have a tripod with quick-release legs. A tripod that is easy to use will see more use, and your photos will improve as a result.
 
 
This image I took in my friend's wine cellar without any studio lightening. So tripod was only way to make some picture. In general, on my road trips I don't like to carry it with me, but to be on the safe side it is always in the car.
 
gunadesign guna andersone wine bottle and lilac