Sunday, June 21, 2015

Photo trip notes- Château de Tracy, France

Château de Tracy stands on a rocky outcrop overlooking the Loire. A 1396 manuscript preserved in the archives of the family d'Assay refers to the purchase of a field name "le Champ du Cri" that is still planted in vineyards and still belongs to the domain.
The current family business has been recreated by the Count and Countess Alain d'Estutt d'Assay in 1952. Three of their children work on the farm in perpetuating the spirit of quality and excellence that has always prevailed. The vineyard of 32 hectares spread over the hill of the Château de Tracy and those of Vilmoy, a few kilometers from away Pouilly sur Loire. The vineyard is planted exclusively with Sauvignon.  

gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, France

gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, France


gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, France

gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, church France

gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, church France

gunadesign guna anderson Château de Tracy, church France





Monday, June 15, 2015

Perspective in Photography

Perspective refers to the relationship of imaged objects in a photograph. This includes their relative positions and sizes and the space between them. It is about representational of a real 3-dimensional scene into a 2D image. This is one of the tricky areas of photography which if a photographer is not consciously aware of, can produce unwanted “distortions” or “flat” uninteresting images.
We are walking around, something catches our eye, and we take a picture right from where we are standing and the image is not what we expected. You need simply a change in perspective.
 
Get Low
Get your camera down towards ground level, and see how it impacts your perspective. Getting down low allows you to feature the foreground of your composition. Getting low can make your subject appear taller or more imposing. Subjects viewed from below can look commanding and powerful. Getting low can also completely disorient your viewer
 
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Get Up High or Look Up High
You can also get up high and take in your subject from above. Getting well above your normal level will certainly give you a new perspective. Spend some time looking up, and you will find plenty to improve your compositions and your perspective Stand at the bottom of a tall building and point your camera up. The converging lines make the building appear smaller at the top, so called ‘keystoning’ effect, and while it is a great way to add a sense of scale, some photographers prefer their shots to look more natural.
 
gunadesign guna andersone church  in Finlandgunadesign guna andersone lonely girl
 
Use Leading Lines
 
Leading lines are a classic use of perspective in photography. By positioning yourself down low and using the lines you can draw the viewers eye into the subject, combine this technique with a deep depth of field and you can give your images an almost three dimensional feel. 
 
gunadesign guna andersone birds
 
Leading lines are a classic use of perspective in photography. By positioning yourself down low and using the lines you can draw the viewers eye into the subject, combine this technique with a deep depth of field and you can give your images an almost three dimensional feel.